THE SOUTHEAST OUTLOOK - Jan.11.2018

VOLUME 47, ISSUE 2 Outlook Connecting people to Jesus and one another JANUARY 11 , 2018 WWW. SOUTHEASTOUTLOOK . ORG Wild Game Feed set for Jan. 28 Page 4 502-528-3741 725 Speckman Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40243 www.eastpointaudiology.com We provide in-office repairs on all hearing aid makes and models. 13121 Eastpoint Park Blvd, Ste 1A Louisville, KY 40223 TINNITUS: Common, Constant, Incurable — but Very Manageable If you have been experiencing ringing in your ears or a slight loss of hearing in one or both ears, you may be experiencing tinnitus. Our office provides comprehensive solutions that can help keep you, your friends, and your family healthy and happy. “ Let’s have a conversation about improving your life through better hearing. Our patients are a special part of our family, and we promise to treat you with the kind of care you deserve. We’re experts at helping your tinnitus and hearing needs.” — Dr. Melanie Driscoll, Audiologist/Practice Owner 502 .548.0589 We provide in-office repairs on all hearing aid makes and models. 13121 Eastpoint Park Blvd, Ste 1A Louisville, KY 40223 TINNITUS: Common, Constant, Incurable — but Very Manageable If you have been experiencing ringing i your ears or a slight loss of hearing in one or both ears, you may be experiencing tinnitus. Our office provides comprehensive solutions that can help keep you, your friends, and your family healthy and happy. “ Let’s have a conversation about improving your life through better hearing. Our patients are a special part of our family, and we promise to treat you with the kind of care you deserve. We’re experts at helping your tinnitus and hearin needs.” — Dr. Melanie Driscoll, Audiologist/Practice Owner 502.548.0589 Melanie Driscoll, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology Hear better in the new year with a complimentary hearing screening a d $500 off a technology purchase* Offers cannot be combined with each other or any other offers. Good on an AGX5, 7, or 9 purchase. Expires 1/31/2018 Kristin Lenz, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology BY MADALYN WILBANKS | mwilbanks@secc.org Mike Graham lived to hear his heavenly Father say, “Well done, my good and faithful servant.” Graham, 74, died Dec. 29, 2017. The many people who have been impacted by his life and minis- try can picture the scene long anticipated: Graham being greeted at the gates of heaven by the God he loved and served for so many years. Graham battled numerous illnesses for 30 years. When he was first diagnosed with lymphoma in 1988, doctors gave him six months to live. Six months came and went, and the 29 years that followed were marked by both trials and faithfulness. Doctors considered him a rare case. He endured brain cancer, skin cancer, pneumonia, five MRSA infections, type 2 diabetes, congestive heart failure and squamous cell carcinoma. He withstood MRIs, skin grafts, multiple brain surgeries, a back surgery and rounds of radiation and chemotherapy. Medications and pain were constants. “I can’t think of anyone that I know who has suffered more,” retired Southeast Senior Minister Bob Russell said at Graham’s funeral. Mike Graham • 1943-2017 fai t hful always PLEASE SEE GRAHAM, PAGE 2 f i l e p h oto by St e p h e n P o w e l l / T h e S o u t h e a st o u t lo o k Mike Graham served as a model for how to live life for Jesus Christ in the midst of adversity. Southeast is haven to refugees who now live without fear By RUTH SCHENK | Contributing Writer Amran Nkurunziza was so young when her family fled their home in Somalia that she has no memory of random killings, hunger or the fear of wondering if they would survive another day. She has, however, tracked what happens in Somalia her entire life. Looking back, Nkurunziza, now 23, believes God rescued her from danger and took her to Kenya where she met missionari s, heard that Jesus loves her and died for her sins and decided to follow Him the rest of her life. She knows that would not have happened in Somalia where there is one vacant church, threat of death for anyone who has a Bible and extreme persecution for anyone who chooses to follow Jesus. In Somalia, which is predominantly Muslim, there is no safe haven for Christians. At the Global Missions Health Conference held at Southeast Christian Church’s Blankenbaker Campus in November, plenary speaker Nik Rip- ken described the country as “evil unmasked.” His prayer is that Somalis who come to Jesus will send believers throughout the Muslimworld. That is happening in Somali settlements where Christians share the Gospel. It’s happen- PLEASE SEE REFUGEES, PAGE 3 Home safe Home Amran Nkurunziza, 23, believes God put her on a path fr m Somalia to Louisville. 

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